Identity Designed is a showcase of brand identity projects from around the world.

ISEM

Contributed by Milan-based designer Mattia Castiglioni.

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM is the Italian market leader for luxury packaging in cosmetics and perfumery. Established in 1949, in 2011 the company started a new chapter in its history, repositioning itself in national and foreign markets with new goals and a new corporate image.

The goals included making boxes and making them special, designed with care and attention to the smallest details, to shapes, and to construction quality. The luxury market represents to ISEM the main production platform, hence the need for a new corporate image able to go along with the company’s ambitions.

The corporate image needed to express ISEM’s identity: it’s conceptually creative, structured, organized shapes and layout, characterized by a strong, memorable and highly distinctive sign, as well as being able to introduce a message of innovation.

The logotype becomes a box, with the company’s name to be read within the product that it produces. Colour becomes a mark. The orange highlights a solid and organized business structure, by interacting with an equally sophisticated typography.

Boxes: big, small, simple, complex. To tell about all that, I developed an iconic system based on the graphic stylization of boxes, accompanied by pleasant patterns that alternate with the compositional rigor of the new logotype.

A system able to evolve and to successfully carry the company along its journey.

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

ISEM brand identity design

View more work on Mattia Castiglioni’s website. Visit ISEM.

11 much appreciated comments about “ISEM”

  1. I quite like this. Well done Mattia.

  2. I dislike this; for me it tries to hard to be clever and ends up being completely unreadable.

    It looks pretty and I love all the colours and materials created for the brand, but I feel it’s far to impractical a design.

  3. I agree with @Amanda, the colours are great, but the logotype is unreadable. Sure, it’s new and different, but doesn’t appeal as a design. It looked better before it was split, I’d be happy with it set in good ol’ Helvetica Bold. Yes, Helvetica Bold is used constantly in branding, but it’s timeless, and in this case I’d be comfortable with an unsplit logotype set in Helvetica bold.

  4. This is a really special piece of design for me and it’s work such as this, with edge, that keeps me inspired. The colours and sensitivity, not to mention the strong concept and beautiful abstract nature of the forms fit on the various substrates with vitality and presence.

    I agree that its non conventional nature might be perceived as trying too hard, but I’d rather try too hard and fail for some, whilst inspiring and impressing others – than by treading the vanilla path of mediocrity that many clients appear to insist upon.

    ‘Illegible’ logos are no problem as far as I’m concerned if they still communicate brand values and offer a professional (and stylish) representation of the business/services. I love abstract art and it’s influences and the way this plays with convention I believe is a resounding success. Brilliant, well done.

    I’d love a client with the vision to allow me to develop this kind of work, but I fear in times of austerity the acceptance of risk has lead to a safer approach for many.

  5. *shrug*

    No legibility issue at all for me.

  6. This is a great solution, manages to stay fairly conservative in everything except the main identity. I think it’s perfectly legible and any identity that makes the brain work for a second or two is a good thing in my book.

    They really have stuck their neck out with this and I believe it communicates the feeling of something special and luxury but in a different tone to the usual used in the cosmetics industry.

  7. I take the point of legibility into account, but I still really like it. Its visually stunning and conceptually original and strong. The repeat the name in the orange circle as well which helps communicate the company and the logo type is more of a ‘symbol’ for me. It is not easy to read, but it does make you look twice and actually want to read it. And once you look twice you can work it out anyway.

  8. When I look at it, like anyone will, I feel like I need to read it twice – then I feel frustrated and irritated … then I stop bothering to try.

    I feel this should be the graphical icon with the company name written (explained) below.

    Sure it won’t be as beautiful and clean, but I don’t feel good design is about just being beautiful and innovative.

  9. Nicely executed – but very confusing and right now failing; simply from a communication aspect.

    I would call for a focus group to determine what percentage of the intended target audience can actually read this. It’s too cryptic and Amanda is correct – it’s clearly illegible.

  10. Yes, it’s a bit hard to make it out… but it looks nice! Not every piece of design has to be spoon fed, it doesn’t hurt for us to spend a little extra time trying to work something out once in a while.

  11. I love the work of Mattia Castiglioni, especially this one : http://myartyshow.wordpress.com/2011/07/27/mattia-castiglioni-la-drle-de-mort/

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