Identity Designed is a showcase of brand identity projects from around the world.

Kidstudio

Contributed by Marco Innocenti of Florence-based Kidstudio.

Kidstudio brand identity

Our studio’s rebranding project was born when we actually changed home and moved from a medium location to a much bigger one, divided over 2 floors and in 17 different rooms, with a nice (huge) terrace and so much sun from each one of the windows.

After a decade-old brand identity that we’ve been proud of, we decided we needed to take a step forward. The idea was more or less that we didn’t need to represent ourselves with an icon or mark in the strict sense of the term. We’d prefer to be considered an entity on our own and not whatever an image would suggest to the reader’s eyes.

So, after being a cyan, multilayered studio for so much time, we decided to be…

Kidstudio, period.

Kidstudio brand identity

Kidstudio brand identity

We started by designing a simple logotype with bold, firm characters and colours. We appended a “period” at the end to intensify the sense of being us and us alone.

Kidstudio brand identity

The colour, a nice shade of grey, was chosen after a long time thinking about different hues. A little less than black (for us being supportive to the clients, not enforcing, if you get what I mean), much more than any other colour. This gave birth to a singular, high-contrast, bold new way of expressing ourselves without reasoning around shapes and pictures.

What we got was an actual rebirth. Born again, new, different and strong.

From the logo we developed a full typeface, named “Kidot.” It meant “K, period”: again, a statement. A very beautiful font that we decided to keep as our own instead of putting it on the market, maybe losing some income in the process.

Kidstudio brand identity

The identity then pretty much shaped itself. We started furnishing (and cleaning and painting) the studio and finally decided to stay greyscale on everything. A subtle shade of green is present on part of the walls (a very pale green, almost light grey), the rest is either white or black, including the artpieces we showcase and the painting we did ourselves. All our stationery is white (when it has to be written onto, i.e. the letterheads and envelopes) and dark grey — so dark that it looks black.

We used Fedrigoni papers for everything, the special Savile Row dark grey, and turned every bit of colour in the studio to black. The only hues present would have been those of the projects we do for our clients. (I must admit that part of the need to turn greyscale was due to the fact we lived for ages inside green and red painted rooms… we had enough, I suppose). Special varnishes were used on the business cards and on the folders we use for presenting projects or for storing materials.

The full project took a little more than four months, including the time-consuming accommodation of the new studio and the very difficult font design.

Kidstudio brand identity

Kidstudio brand identity

Kidstudio brand identity

Kidstudio brand identity

Kidstudio brand identity

Kidstudio brand identity

Kidstudio brand identity

Kidstudio brand identity

View some of the team’s work on the Kidstudio website. Follow Kidstudio on Twitter.

2 appreciated remarks about “Kidstudio”

  1. I really like how they took the time to develop their own typeface for their studio. The color scheme they used is great as well.

  2. Love the look! Typeface is great as well. I honestly didn’t like it at first but as I read more I see why they did what they did. It works, and re-branded at the perfect time. All that said, I would have still liked to see a little bit of color, maybe some colors in the same hue as the dark gray they mentioned. IDK, but still, I digress, it tuned out great.

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