Identity Designed is a showcase of brand identity projects from around the world.

Limitd

Contributed by Newcastle-based designer Dan Burgess.

Limitd logo

Limitd was created to “seek out the best emerging art and photography and offer it in limited editions, at affordable prices.”

When I was approached by the founders of this exciting new company, my brief was to design a strong, memorable, yet universally accessible identity for their business. The name was initially Print Club, or Limit’d Print Club, which is the reason for the exploration of the school/crest logos. It was then decided that being known as a “club” could have negative connotations and feel unapproachable. In the end, simplicity won out and Limitd was born.

Initial logo explorations…

Limitd logo

Initial logotype sketches…

Limitd logo

Logotype development…

Limitd logo

The custom logotype portrays a fresh and friendly brand and was inspired by both vintage camera logos and a resemblance of an artist’s own signature. Limitd’s focus is helping to strengthen the reputation of new talent, so the artist’s signature is an important and fitting visual element.

Limitd brand identity

Limitd logo

There is also an accompanying visual system — a geometric pattern inspired by the angle of pictures hanging on a wall. This imagery reflects the variety and striking quality of prints available from Limitd.

Limitd brand identity

Certificate of authenticity with embossed logo…

Limitd brand identity

Limitd brand identity

Limitd brand identity

The packaging for shipping prints, including custom rubber stamps…

Limitd brand identity

Limitd brand identity

Limitd brand identity

Limitd brand identity

Limitd brand identity

Limitd brand identity

The prints featured in the photos above are Gene Deep by Amanda Johnston and Pliable by Benjamin Swanson — both available from the Limitd website (designed by Papertank).

Limitd brand identity

Limitd brand identity

Limitd brand identity

Limitd brand identity

View more brand identity work in the portfolio of Dan Burgess. Follow Dan on Twitter.

13 appreciated remarks about “Limitd”

  1. I’m in two minds… on one hand I love it, on the other hand it looks a little disjointed.

    I like the logotype, but the the angular shapes etc. don’t seem to sit well with it.

    I’m all for the stamps though, I love a good stamp!

  2. I find the kerning and spacing of “Limited” not plausible for a script. Why have ligatures and tight spacing for “it” but not for “Li”? I also find it strange that inter-letter spacing is smaller than the room within characters – I would have expected the opposite. When you look at the initial sketches non of these features are present.

  3. This is fantastic. I especially love the logotype and the colour scheme.

  4. I agree with Christian… The spacing between the L and the i feels awkward. It is almost as if the L is not part of the word. I love the stamps and the colour palette, though!

  5. I like that a lot. It looks stylish without looking poncy and I find it very fitting for the client. The kerning doesn’t bother me, I think it looks nice. I also initially balked at the curvy logotype and the angular shapes, but after looking at it a few times, I think it works well.

    Like Abbas, I also like a good stamp, and these stamps are lovely.

    Some of those early logo explorations are ‘interesting’…

  6. Looks like Dan enjoyed working on this one, which is how it should be. You spend a lot of your life working, why shouldn’t you enjoy it? It shows in the work.

    I like the Ltd. so much more than the Limitd logo. It’s feels right and works really well on the stamp but together they feel like two brands that just happen to look similar. It seems strange that they didn’t keep to one or the other.

    I’d like to know the story behind that.

    I’d also like to know why the founders of the company are doing what they are doing and if there is any story behind the company and if that comes out in the identity.

    Overall as a brand, all the other elements work well and look and feel great together. It’s good that Dan managed to persuade the client to go for the best concept.

  7. I suppose if you were going to be super critical, I keep seeing the little inconsistency of the first “i”joining the “m” letter different to how the second “i” joins the “t”. It seems there’s not so much of a curve on the first “i”. Now i’ve noticed it, it’s all I see.

  8. Hi all, this is Dan, the designer for the project. Thank you for your comments, it’s great to get such a variety of feedback. I’ll try and answer a couple of questions that have come up…

    Christian, not sure what you mean exactly by ‘not plausible’ but I can assure you many different spacing combinations were tried. I know what you mean about the gap between the L and the i, but it really was necessary – any tighter and the legibility was affected and it felt very claustrophobic. Plus I think the distinctive L needs its own space anyway.

    Lee, the team behind the company are great guys. They are recent photography graduates themselves and started Limitd to enable people to buy the work of up and coming artists and photographers. This approach to new talent inspired the fresh colour palette and overall feel of the brand.

    The Ltd. mark was created for certain applications where space was an issue, such as the stickers and social media avatars. I don’t think the guys are using it much as they are keen to always have the full name, Limitd, prominent and memorable, which makes sense.

    Also, I did enjoy this project very much – I’m glad that comes across in my work Lee!

    Thanks again for all the comments, I appreciate the feedback.

  9. I love it when the people involved in the project comment, especially when not all the other comments are glowing.

    Thanks, Dan. It’s a lovely piece of work which you and the client should be very proud of. The more I look at it, the more I like it.

  10. Hey Dan, I think overall, the brand and its elements look smashing. I also see on first glance, the first ‘i’ is unfitting with the rest of the word, it doesn’t seem to flow with the curves. In my opinion it should have had the same base curve as the second ‘i’ . But I understand as you’ve already said, you have probably tried all possibilities and this worked best for both you and the client in the end.

  11. Tidy logotype. I didn’t pick-up on the inspiration from vintage camera logos initially, but it’s certainly refreshing to see the whole processes being revealed along with all of it’s intricacies. Although I realise it’s already be stated in previous comments, but I really feel that the supporting graphic elements and the logotype simply don’t hang together well, making it appear a little disjointed on some of the examples.

  12. I’m basically with the majority on this. I am not a fan of the logo type. All the support graphics are wonderful, however. The only place the logo type looks decent is where it is stamped on the brown mailers. Otherwise I find it awkward at best. Of the logos in the idea phase, that shield with the ‘L’ and single apostrophe as a face was the most exciting to me. Change the shield to a portrait with hanger and I think that would have been better logo mark. But that is just my opinion. In the end as long as the client is very happy and the designer gets paid, all is well with the world. ;)

  13. I love how you explained the inspiration for the logotype coming from old cameras, and I don’t mind it. I think the pattern is a good step away from the logotype and doesn’t feel generic or expected.

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