Identity Designed is a showcase of brand identity projects from around the world.

Over the Moon

Contributed by Cat Spinelli of New South Wales-based The Creative Method.

Over the Moon packaging

Project description: Packaging wraps for various sizes and types of boutique cheese from the Over the Moon dairy company in New Zealand. The products are sold on-premise, in delicatessens and specialty stores throughout the country.

Over the Moon logo

Solution: Over the Moon cheeses are new to the marketplace and needed to have immediate standout and cut-through in the refridgerators of the speciality delicatessens throughout New Zealand. Over the Moon took a contemporary hand crafted approach with a hint of motherly love and humour.

The packaging wraps are handwritten copies of the ‘Hey Diddle Diddle’ nursery rhyme in a white rough type on a black background. The writing is in pencil as a link to the logo but the look of the packaging takes on a blackboard feel to link with the delicatessens where the products are sold.

Over the Moon copy

Over the Moon card

Over the Moon copy

Over the Moon card

Over the Moon card

Over the Moon packaging

Over the Moon website

Client: Over The Moon Dairy Co.
Studio: The Creative Method
Creative/art director: Tony Ibbotson
Designer, typographer, illustrator: Andi Yanto

View more work on The Creative Method website.

12 appreciated remarks about “Over the Moon”

  1. A different approach of design for a cheese company. I can’t decide if it’s a good thing or not.

    At first it evokes cat or dog food for me (I am sorry but it’s right, the font is maybe giving that impression) and then when I look and look and read your description it looks like food for children.

    Whereas cheese is everything to a lot of people… morning, afternoon, night… before meals, after meals, with meat and when drinking…

    I think that we are the consumer group.

    Despite all this, if you want to hold the lovely, motherly concept, you’ve done this successfully.

  2. Mmm, cheese.

    Also, it’d be interesting to know if they considered handwriting analysis in the mix when they chose a style (and writer) for the graphics, or if it was luck of the draw. It’s saying a couple of interesting things about the brand here.

  3. Shawn, what are these interesting things about the brand? Are you interested in grafoloji? :)

    My english is not very good. I try to understand your commons. Did I understand true? Do you mean that grafoloji? or?

  4. Sorry, “commons” is wrong word. “Comment” I want to write.

  5. I have to say having visited New Zealand, design can be pretty lacklustre and rather amateurish at best – possibly due to a lack of value placed on applied arts and an underdeveloped design industry. However this design is simply striking in not only the idea, but is also beautifully executed – something a lot of food packaging in New Zealand is not…

  6. I like it – it definitely grows on you.

    Mixing upper- and lowercase letters is a pet peeve of mine, though.

  7. I went to look at the agency’s website but, oops, I tried to do it on my iPad, so I just got a message telling me I couldn’t look at it.

    I feel so left out.

  8. It’s a nice look. But I don’t believe this design approach is easily sustainable. At some point, they’ll need to start using less handwritten type — and I think that would actually benefit the design by placing more importance on what is handwritten. As it is now, with everything in handwritten type, there’s no discernible hierarchy.

  9. Inci,

    Yes, I’m speaking of graphology. I would be interested to see if their chosen handwriting subconsciously evokes a matching response in the potential consumer, or if it was chosen at random. I know it loosely makes a bit of difference, but it’s interesting to know the creative process that others go through…

    All the best,

    Shawn

  10. Firstly I have to say that I love the overall look and style of the design, whether or not it is suitable for cheese, as demonstrated above, is open for discussion. For me I would be drawn to it, it definitely gives a artisan feel, and as a foodie it would intrigue me to look closer. It was a lot stronger the second time I looked at the post.

    My only suggestions would be to possible drop the blackboard effect from the back of the card (although I understand why it is used), and the use of parchment/wax paper as opposed to foil, but that is obviously down to preserving what I am sure is a beautiful cheese.

    Anyway, I definitely agree with inci on their first post, the overall concept has been executed to a very high standard, yellow/black and the contrast of COTSWOLD and the use of script, also the logo is so simple it just works.

  11. I love the logo design. I think the handwriting is applied too liberally across their materials (especially the website) but this can be toned down easily enough.

  12. Hello – I’m the owner of the design at Over the Moon in NZ.

    Thanks for all your comments which have been really interesting and great to have some industry feedback. We really love it and our clients say it stands out in the cheese bars and fridges. Have had great retail response too.

    Only problem is to replicate it as it’s not standard. However I have a talented signwriter locally who has the alphabet written up now and can re-create what I need – always at a cost though. So we use the OTM font for impact, and other fonts for text. I’ve recently come upon Eraserdust font though, which has the feel of the OTM one.

    If you want to see the font written large, look at the outside of our building!

    Sue Arthur, Over the Moon

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