Identity Designed is a showcase of brand identity projects from around the world.

Pegasus

Contributed by Sydney-bound freelance designer Marcus McCabe, formerly of Liverpool-based Uniform. All work created at Uniform alongside those credited.

Pegasus identity design

The Pegasus Theatre is an Oxford-based arts centre established in 1962. It specialises in a range of performing arts for young people. In 2010 it underwent a multi-million pound refurbishment to provide a new workshop, dressing rooms, dance and rehearsal spaces, as well as creating a new foyer and café for the public. The brief was to develop a new brand that generated interest and excitement in Oxford, that represented the ethos of the organisation moving forward and set them apart from the variety of arts based organisations in Oxford.

Pegasus identity design

Pegasus identity design

Listen and learn

Before any creative was embarked upon, a lot of effort was put in to ensure the needs, expectations, and aspirations of the group were fully understood. A series of workshops, interviews, and consultations were held with all involved in the organisation — ranging from children aged 6 years old to middle aged board members and directors. The conclusion was that the organisation consisted of a diverse number of groups and voices and was much more than a theatre, so it became simply known as ‘Pegasus’. To reinforce this thinking across the board we adopted the new core proposition ‘individual voices in harmony’.

Pegasus identity design

Pegasus identity design

Pegasus identity design

Individual voice in harmony

The brand had to be flexible to represent the variety of voices of Pegasus as a collective, whilst also accommodating them individually where appropriate. The core logo is composed utilising circles of different sizes and colours representing the diverse mix of people, coming together to form the ‘P’ of Pegasus.

The core logo can be split into any one of it’s seven colours allowing it to remain flexible whilst on brand. The supporting wordmark is a nod to Pegasus’s previous Helvetica-based logo, switching to a customised ‘Alte Haas Grotesk’ to give a friendlier more considered feel, which compliments the new brand.

Roll-out included brand guidelines, interior and wayfinding, staff uniforms and accessories, What’s On guides, stationery and virals/stings.

Pegasus identity design

Pegasus identity design

Pegasus identity design

Pegasus identity design

Pegasus identity design

Pegasus identity design

Pegasus identity design

Pegasus identity design

Pegasus identity design

Pegasus identity design

Results

Pegasus had, prior to the re-launch, consistently failed ‘to capture people’s attention’, and to secure the media coverage necessary to grow its audience. Six months after the re-launch, membership numbers had increased by 1,600 to 10,000, outperforming its average six-month figures by 300%.

“It has dramatically improved our ranking. We are no longer an also-ran but are consistently up there in the media with Oxford Playhouse, Museum of Modern Art and Ashmolean.”
— GILL JAGGERS, HEAD OF MARKETING, PEGASUS

Credits

Creative Director: Tim Sharp
Senior Designer: Marcus McCabe
Motion Graphic: Charlie Pastor
Copywriter: Jim Farley

Designed at: Uniform

View more work from Marcus McCabe. Follow Marcus on Twitter.

10 appreciated remarks about “Pegasus”

  1. Great!
    It gives the right perception about the concept.
    Inspiring.

  2. Outstanding identity system! There’s a strategy behind it, and the design activates and amplifies that strategy. Send me a t-shirt please!

    But…given that they executed “a multi-million pound refurbishment to provide a new workshop, dressing rooms, dance and rehearsal spaces, as well as creating a new foyer and café for the public”, it’s a little disingenuous to imply that the design alone is responsible for the 300% increase in membership.

  3. Really not feeling this one, sure it’s a ‘pretty picture’ and all, but it lacks contrasts of design principles. I feel this wouldn’t go down to well printed at small sizes, especially in a single colour.

    The colour scheme is interesting, I’ll give it that.

  4. Interesting and fun. Looks like they had a blast working on the project.

  5. It’s certainly unique. I like it, and it looks great in print.

    Fabulous that it has performed as intended also – which is the point of design after all.

  6. @Amanda, I can agree that it has served it’s purpose, sure the client is happy, the designers behind the project are happy, and that’s great, I don’t agree that that’s what design is all about, that’s not what I’ve been taught.

  7. Just a note:

    I’m not against all of the identities posted here, I just have a black and white way of seeing things, and am highly opinionated, that’s just how I am.

    I apologise if any of you may be offended or disagree with my critiques; just keep in mind that we’re all entitled to different opinions, thus I’m allowed to say what I think (as long as it’s appropriate etc).

  8. This is the reason a logo is one of the most important aspects of creating (or refreshing) and brand. It’s cool to see the logorecycled in an abstract from for the additional marketing elements. Reminds me of The Bahamas identity by Duffy.

    And I agree with Louis, the legibility of the logo will be distorted at smaller sizes, especially on the web. So hopefully, Uniform has a backup plan for different mediums.

  9. @Chuck, I’m sure they’ll whip something up. :)

  10. In my opinion, the logo doesn’t seem to express any kind of clear mantra – resulting in a seemingly ambiguous logo mark and following brand.

    However, the brand is well laid out and fairly well designed. Just a shame there isn’t much of an idea or depth to the work.

What do you think?

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