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Day of Architecture Groningen

Contributed by Pascal Rumph & Hans Gerritsen, founders of Netherlands-based Buro Reng.

Day of Architecture Groningen

The Day of Architecture is a national cultural event in the Netherlands aimed at raising people’s awareness of architecture as much as possible. Architecture is something that has to be experienced, which is why the National Day of Architecture was created by the BNA in 1986.

Every year during the last weekend of June, the public is given the opportunity to visit architectural projects. There are guided tours, lectures, exhibitions, cycling and walking tours, presentations and debates. And the Open Office Architectural was initiated in 2011, allowing the public to catch a glimpse of the architects offices.

Buro Reng designed a new font — a transformation of the Helvetica font — for the Day of Architecture Groningen, as part of the new branding and communications for the annual event.

The design for the project style is based on three different logos using Helvetica. Our purpose was to create an illusion of space by gradually narrowing and transforming the Helvetica characters. This transformation — combined with the stacking of the characters — is a clear reference to architecture.

Day of Architecture Groningen

Day of Architecture Groningen

Day of Architecture Groningen

Day of Architecture Groningen

Day of Architecture Groningen

Day of Architecture Groningen

Day of Architecture Groningen

Day of Architecture Groningen

Day of Architecture Groningen

Day of Architecture Groningen

Day of Architecture Groningen

Day of Architecture Groningen

Day of Architecture Groningen

Day of Architecture Groningen

Design
Project- and event-style / program brochure / poster / animation

View more brand identity work on the Buro Reng website. Follow Buro Reng on Twitter.

3 much appreciated comments about “Day of Architecture Groningen”

  1. The idea behind this is clever, and I must say, unique, however I feel it just isn’t visually appealing as a design. I mean, all they’ve done is squashed and stretched Helvetica’s letters, which in turn has made it illegible to a point that only the middle characters can be read clearly.

    I think this could’ve been executed better, perhaps a more obvious architecture-themed design? Maybe a commissioned structural/architectural inspired typeface could’ve been made to promote the event? Perhaps a mechanical/structural approach to the layout, colours, type etc could’ve been used.

    Even making the brochure and other related media look visibly set on a grid, or even showing the grid would’ve given a better idea.

    But this, this doesn’t seem to convey architectural design in my opinion, perhaps it’s fine when it comes to representing a pillar/column of a building, or some fanciful curved stonework, but in today’s society, it’s not so much a representation of modern architecture.

    That being said, it could seem that the design is representative of older architecture of the past, but maybe it just isn’t quite putting that message across as intended.

    Same goes for the stacking, sure it’s similar to the idea of building a building by stacking things together, and building upon a foundation, but that idea is lost in this piece to be honest.

    I’m sure the event would go swimmingly though, and I imagine not too many of the Dutch would really be bothered with how well the design conveys the concept behind it. The whole point of it all is to raise an awareness for architectural design, the past, present and future of it, and get people to appreciate it – and I guess that’s what really matters at the end of the day.

  2. I like the brochures better than the banners because a brochure provides more context. Expressing the shape of buildings by transforming text is quite abstract. It appeals to me and I could imagine to architects, designers and artists but does it work for a broader audience? I’d be curious to know how the colors where chosen.

    I remember (but can’t find) a poster that showed skyscrapers (in New York or Chicago). In front of those was text that was bent like the sharp corners of these buildings. The underlying photo helped me to make the connection.

    The Art Collection of North Rhine-Westphalia in Germany uses a logo using a similar effect: http://www.kunstsammlung.de/

  3. Very strong concept, brochure is beautiful. The logo is hard to read at a distance, especially in the first photo of the banner sign. Wondering if it was stretched just a little too much or if there is an alternate version for distance viewing that isn’t stretched as far. Regardless, I love the concept.

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