Identity Designed is a showcase of brand identity projects from around the world.

GO

Contributed by Ronit Peled of Tel Aviv-based TAB.

GO logo

GO is the first brand of its kind to be launched in Israel. Their mission is to build sustainability awareness by offering high-quality, environmentally-friendly lighting solutions to all public institutions and leading architects around the country. The founders of this eco-friendly company approached us with a need for a name, strategy, identity and visual language that would make them stand out in the growing field of “green” design.

We created a memorable name, a black and white colour palette, and came up with eco-friendly printing solutions to emphasize the brand’s essence. The people at GO and our team at TAB wanted to send out the message that building a strong and smart foundation of sustainable awareness is essential in today’s moving world.

It can be pretty simple to change the world together (one eco-friendly light bulb at a time).

Ready. Set. GO!

GO logo

GO logo

GO logo

GO logo

GO logo

GO logo

View more brand identity work on the TAB website.

8 appreciated remarks about “GO”

  1. I’ll be honest, I’m not sure I get it. It just seems to me there’s not really enough to go on to judge this as a brand identity.

    Looking at the second paragraph, for example:

    “We created a memorable name…”

    But where did it come from? What was the rationale? Were any other names considered? Is there a cultural reason? I love finding out the back story behind brand names.

    “…a black and white colour palette…”

    Clearly, but why black and white? Again, I’d be really interested to know the thinking behind it.

    “…and came up with eco-friendly printing solutions to emphasize the brand’s essence.”

    Such as? These kinds of things fascinate me and can often be those magical ‘aha’ items that really show how much thought has been put into the branding process.

    “The people at GO and our team at TAB wanted to send out the message that building a strong and smart foundation of sustainable awareness is essential in today’s moving world.”

    Great, but where can we see this? There’s virtually no copy included here, so it’s hard to get a clear idea of how this is expressed.

    I’m also unsure of what the animation is meant to show. Were these ideas considered and rejected? Are they used elsewhere? The collection of other symbols leaves me asking the same questions (the light bulb representations, etc).

    Has the brand actually been launched yet? There are no pictures of the products, for a start, and there’s no link to a website – neither could I find one when I searched.

    All in all, the images look fine, but there’s just not enough for me to really form an opinion as to whether it’s appropriate or not.

  2. All top questions, Richard. I’ll try to be more thorough with followup features. Thanks for the continued visits.

  3. Thanks for your comments and I will try to be more thorough in explaining the conceptual thinking behind our projects in the future. To answer one of your questions, the name GO came from the simple idea of a green light. A green light in the sense of an energy smart light. We took that idea further to actual green traffic lights which tell us to move forward, proceed and act. We then combined these ideas to create the brand’s name.

  4. Ronit – Thanks for answering, it’s very good of you. I love the idea behind the name, so simple yet it conveys the message brilliantly. This was how I understood it at first, so it’s nice to know my gut instinct doesn’t fail every time!

    David (and Ronit) – Sorry if some of my questions came across as a little terse, but I find the thinking and development that goes into brands fascinating. Thanks to both for humouring me.

  5. While the overall work is good, I love the main Catalog CD packaging. It plays well together and for those paying attention it’ll give them that “aha!” moment we are so fond of.

  6. It’s very simple but it works and looks bold in different prints. The most interesting for me are the sketches.

  7. I can understand Richard’s reaction, though I do ‘get it’ as a branding exercise.

    As a fellow designer, I can interpret some of the subtle decisions made across the execution – such as keeping to black and white to be economic with inks and pigments (hence the environmental consideration).

    Most of what has been outlined in the rationale has been translated maybe too cryptically throughout the visual system, and the way in which it is presented currently has to many holes in the communication to connect the logic, especially for someone viewing it at face value.

  8. I am also in the lighting business and a regular follower of David Airey. I think it is nearly impossible to create a logo resembling light, as I have never seen any brand image, logo, etc. in our industry until now which I could say — yes, this is it.

What do you think?

Comments may be edited or deleted if the moderator doesn't like the cut of your jib (quite unlikely).