MTLA identity

Hype Type Studio commissioned Mark Bloom to collaborate on this project for Mark Tessier (MTLA), a full-service landscape architectural firm based in Los Angeles, California.

MTLA are passionate about how the landscape evolves with time and use. Designing site-specific design solutions for exterior environments that unveil a sense of beauty, accessibility, environmental responsibility and usability. Building from this same foundation, the MTLA logo marque sits within the spatial boundaries and physicality of a contained space which then evolves and breaks out to create the full wordmark. As the environments they design evolve, enhance spaces and create intrigue, so too does the logo.

The Mark Tessier Landscape Architecture logo represents the clients deep understanding of spacial planning and bridges the complex relationship between architecture and landscape.

MTLA identityMTLA design ideas (above), and final outcome (below).

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

MTLA identity

More from Mash Creative and Hype Type Studio.

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November 7, 2014

Comments

Very nice, minimal design but can’t help thinking I have seen this type of execution for architectural branding many times before…

I’m not sure about this.

When it’s all written out it’s clear, but I read the initials as ‘malt’ which doesn’t make sense. Although I like the minimal design, I feel in this case it might be a bit too minimal. The unused blocks of grey on the website, for example, feel a bit cold for what look like some very appealing landscapes. Perhaps they will fill in over time in the same way gardens evolve? Same with the copy: “site-specific design solutions for exterior environments” sounds a bit clinical for creating a lovely outdoor spaces.

I find an odd lack of personality for a company that designs places “people want to be in”. I also don’t see much evidence of “art, historical references, sustainability, materials, and natural elements” other than in the copy on the website.

Hopefully the identity, like the spaces they design, will evolve and change over time and it will feel more coherent. I want to like it, I just find it a bit hard to follow.

(P.S. David, architecture is misspelt in the title.)

The switch from monogram to wordmark is more memorable than the wordmark on its own, which I like. I can see why you read malt, though. Richard. It has a wordsearch feel to it. But without wanting to post-rationalise, the puzzle aspect kind of relates to the service, taking a plot of land…

What most appeals are the print and site layouts. Appropriate, well considered.

Thanks for the correction, by the way.

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