Anjuna Ice Pops

Contributed by Budapest-based DekoRatio.

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

The Anjuna Ice Pops brand was created by Milán Szabó and József Szalay, two ambitious guys who love to travel. They came up with the idea of an ice pop store during one of their trips to India, where they were mesmerised by the beauty of a particular seashore in Goa, called Anjuna. Hence the brand name.

We designed their visual identity based on Indian and Holi imagery. The elephant is a sacred animal in India, but it also represents strength, wisdom, and good luck. That’s why we chose it for the Anjuna logo. That said, our goal was to create a lovely character rather than a religious symbol. As for the complementary visual elements, the colourful, dusty clouds remind us of the Holi festival. We also designed the shop’s interior, where we added small details that fit perfectly into the whole “surfer, beach” concept.

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Our studio was responsible for all print and signage, too, as we have our own printing facility. We owe our “Signs” team a huge thanks as they spent many hours of overtime finishing the shop for launch day.

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identitySzani Mészáros, graphic designer

Graphic design: Szani Mészáros
Interior design: Zsófia Nagy & Szani Mészáros
Animation: Richard Woth
Photography: Kevin Harald Campean

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

Anjuna Ice Pops identity

View more identity work on the DekoRatio website.

11 responses

  1. I disagree about using an elephant for the brand. Like is said in the post, the elephant is a sacred animal in India. I think that you hurt/disrespect the culture of India and make a clown joke of elephant by using it as your brand, especially ice pops, which in my opinion are associated with children, sweets, and craving, contrary to the elephant as a religious symbol. You should consider using certain symbol or thing that avoids misunderstanding/clashing in other countries/cultures. There are many others symbols out there to use for ice pops, but taking one from a religious area is an unwise choice.

  2. I understand the religious context but I think it’s fresh, peaceful, happy, sweet. I wouldn’t worry too much about using an elephant as a symbol, and besides, we’re talking a Hungary-based store, just selling ice pops. Above all: animals are not ‘owned’ by a religion. It’s beautiful nature.
    Ps. Very happy to see that imo this work confirms the upcoming trend of mixing digital with traditional graphic work. Best regards.

  3. Ardi,

    To say a brand shouldn’t use an elephant because of religious connotations is slightly absurd.

    The reasoning behind the design choices are outlined above and acknowledge the relationship with religion with respect. The influence has come from someone’s cultural experiences — to ignore being influenced by your life experiences would make for a pretty basic portfolio.

    All the best,

    James

  4. This is a very interesting scenario as I am an introductory brand designer. The visual elements are beautiful and technical design is spot on, as always. But I can understand the cause of friction.

    Now I am unsure of the population diversity in Budapest, so me making a claim of cultural insensitivity would be ridiculously uninformed, however, I think time will tell whether or not people are comfortable with Anjuna Ice Pops (so far they are likeable based on their Facebook page). I do understand that this is a very important icon in Hinduism that is being taken out of context of that culture and being used (in another culture) as a means to sell a product, but is this the first time we’ve seen this happen? And is this icon being mistreated?

    I appreciate this design not only for its visual aspects but also how it handles the balancing act of keeping the integrity of an icon intact while simultaneously using it as the face of a business. This might be a different conversation if this project had been handled in a different way but the simplicity of the icon (at least for me) doesn’t damage its reputation; instead it makes it more accessible as well as being more aware of its existence.

  5. Hey people, just relax. I’m a graphic designer from India, and I also lived very near to Anjuna Beach in Goa.

    Actually, I didn’t find any misuse of the Elephant icon (Lord Ganesha). I think it’s a pretty nice use of the Elephant. If it is used for any abusive product or service, such as alcohol or sex-related products, then it may well be hurtful. But in the case of ‘Anjuna Pops’ it’s looking very cool!

    Cheers, Gourish Sonar.

    • That’s the problem, it’s “cool.” Graphic design / communication design should mean more, and should do more, than just look “cool.”

  6. Ardi, I really like the idea. As a hindu I think it’s very powerful because if you go anywhere in Nepal, I think also in other hindu places like India, god Ganesh is always placed at the entrance, or is the first god to worship among millions of other gods to start a ceremony. And it’s a god always associated with sweets. Here the direction is completely fine with a good sense of humour by relating it with an ice cream.

  7. Looks absolutely fantastic. I’m from India, too, and it doesnt hurt any feelings regarding religion. It’s an identity shaped by professionals and we should be proud of that reaching overseas. Well done on your work.

  8. I definitely don’t think it should hurt religious sentiments, because we see statues of Ganesha playing cricket here in India, it’s not a problem as long as it’s a harmless interpretation. It’s aptness is debatable here, though. Even if Ganesha symbolises ‘Good Luck’ so do a lot of Gods and Goddesses in the Indian pantheon (Hindus here have so many). Also it looks religious to us, and the shop is in Goa, it’s very much like putting a crucifix in a logo, to draw an analogy.

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