SugarSin

Contributed by Dan Bernstein, creative partner of London-based & SMITH.

SugarSin brand identity

A distinctly modern sweet shop, SugarSin opens later this year in London.

Appointed to design a brand identity, our aim was to communicate the philosophy that sweets are a treat for everybody, not just children. Having designed a logotype and a playful, lollipop inspired marque we created an eclectic illustration-led palette for packaging and stationery. Black and white images of everyday objects are combined with accents in primary colours, suggesting a sophisticated tone appealing to adults as well as children.

SugarSin brand identity

SugarSin brand identity

SugarSin brand identity

SugarSin brand identity

SugarSin brand identity

SugarSin brand identity

SugarSin brand identity

SugarSin brand identity

& SMITH elsewhere on Identity Designed: Shrewsbury, Wild Lime Bar & Kitchen.

View more identity work on the & SMITH website.

7 responses

  1. (in my opinion) Too trendy, slab serifs are out. It looks like a retro stop motion video, I would push that further, create the video and make the visuals(biz cards, cup/box wraps, even the logo) the clips. Make it all holograms, everything, now that would be something to look at.

  2. This reminds me of http://identitydesigned.com/140/. I do like the store front that puts a colorful accent on classical front, the name, and the clever logo. Everything else invokes a retro feeling that I feel is neither relevant nor long lasting. The interior and shelfs are quite bland to support the brand.

  3. Personally, I think it’s a great use of Archer. I think it fits the eclectic design well. It keeps the playful-but-grounded feeling of the look. Loving the identity overall. I think this is a case where people take it a little too seriously – it’s a candy shop. The look can change but still revolve around the logo.

  4. I also don’t see anything wrong with the fun and playful retro feel. It’s a candy shop after all and one of their main demographics is children. Also, saying a specific type style is out or is too trendy is looking at typography in the wrong way. You should pick typography based on what’s appropriate for the product and/or service not what’s in or what’s not. I also really love that S swirl mark. Has a nice organic feel about it. I’m not a big fan of the sporadic black and white imagery throughout the identity. Just think it could have been executed better. The pink interior of the cup is a nice touch though.

  5. I think the retro, playfulness is apt. It has a feel of nostalgia for the big kids while still been playful enough for the little one’s imaginations. I’m not a huge fan of the typeface used here and I don’t think it’s trendy either.

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