The Lovely Clinic identity

Many brands find themselves in a trap. It comes from having a sector where a lot of the key players have been trained in a similar way, by similar people to do jobs that are similar. Charities often suffer from this. It’s got a great name. Mimetic isomorphism.

In organisation theory mimetic isomorphism refers to the tendency of an organisation to imitate another organisation’s structure because of the belief that the structure of the latter organisation is beneficial. So with charities, for example, you’ll see lots of competing brands doing the same things — showing needy images accompanied by a cry for cash.

Similarly, the beauty sector is awash with images of impossibly beautiful women who hint that if it wasn’t for a particular brand they’d resemble the back of an elephant rather than a glowing example of perfection.

We won the opportunity to become the lead brand partner and break out of the sector norms for leading doctor Sarah Tonks for her new brand The Lovely Clinic.

Our strategic review revealed that transformative approaches to our appearances — while seen as desirable — are underpinned by a deep worry that by changing the surface aesthetic you may mask or alter the personality of the person beneath. This inspired an unconventional approach for the new endeavour.

The Lovely Clinic identity

Dr Tonks, while entirely able to radically alter a persons appearance, takes a different view to many in the sector — preferring to get to know the person, before offering advice and actions to alter any part of their appearance. This way, her work complements the persons character rather than sitting awkwardly on top of it.

‘It’s you, just lovelier.’ is the way the brand is now described, and this strategic point of view informed a radical new way of looking at the visual brand identity.

Our lead designer on the project Emma English elaborates:

“The idea that the brand’s work is there to enable people to achieve an elevated position was fascinating. Dr Tonks’ approach looks at the person first and builds from there. They very much remain themselves, just lovelier — which may sound superficial, but her clients really benefit, coming out of the process more confident, content, and ultimately happier.”

Our senior designer Tom Myers adds:

“Universally held beliefs of beauty are thin on the ground. Every culture has its own idea of perfection — particularly concerning human beauty. We centred on the visual theme of paint — globally recognised as a way of either enhancing the existing, or a way of working with basic elements to create something astonishing.”

The Lovely Clinic identity

The Lovely Clinic identity

The Lovely Clinic identity

The construct is a proven one, as our founder Simon Manchipp explains:

“BrandWorlds consist of more than the usual logo/typeface/colour — they involve a range of elements that construct an operating system for products, services and organisations to deploy across multiple channels. This allows new brands to adapt in a more agile way to developing opportunities.”

The paint system works both on a simple visual level, moving the brand into ownable territory as well as opening up a terrific tone of voice and approach for the brand’s communications. By applying the paint systems to anything, they make them lovelier.

The Lovely Clinic identity

The Lovely Clinic identity

From a traditional surgical background, and with degrees in both medicine and dentistry, Dr Tonks is able to combine established and proven non-surgical aesthetic treatments with her new passion for holistic, natural therapies to maximise the results of your treatment, making her one of London’s premier practitioners of anti-ageing medicine.

The Lovely Clinic brand launches in Spring 2017.

The Lovely Clinic identity

The Lovely Clinic identity

The Lovely Clinic identity

The Lovely Clinic identity

The Lovely Clinic identity

The Lovely Clinic identity

The Lovely Clinic identity

The Lovely Clinic identity

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More on the SomeOne website.

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February 7, 2017

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