Wallspace brand identity

With an existing business specialising in anti-graffiti and urban maintenance services, this client came to us for ideas to help launch a new ‘wall wrapping’ product that can be applied to almost any surface. From the outset, we wanted to create a name and brand language that was indicative of the product itself together with the environment it was designed to be used in.

After careful consideration and exstensive research (and wrap-based names), it was decided that Wallspace® ticked all the boxes. The name was flexible enough that we could couple the suffix ‘space’ with a variety of key adjectives to describe both the product and the service offering.

The isometric grid based logo and pattern allowed us to demonstrate the potentially colourful and versatile nature of the material and gave us the perfect medium through which to communicate brand messages and personality.

Wallspace brand identity

Wallspace brand identity

Wallspace brand identity

Wallspace brand identity

Wallspace brand identity

Wallspace brand identity

Wallspace brand identity

Wallspace brand identity

Wallspace brand identity

Wallspace brand identity

Wallspace brand identity

Wallspace brand identity

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May 8, 2012

Comments

I really like the mix of structure and urban art, the very modular and geometric nature of the assets and the dimensionality achieved across the website. The use of illusory contours to complete the topside of the logo-mark, while being appropriately representative of the ‘wrap’ nature of the product, appears a little flat alongside the solid forms of the bricks. The colour palette is bright, contemporary and clearly prints very well giving plenty of life to an industrial product, the concrete texture delivers sufficient contrast and although obvious in its urban reference feels justified and relevant.

Firstly I have to say I really like the colour combination used on the brand guidelines page and the website, that concrete grey and what I think is a turquoise go really well together imo.

However, now I’m going to be in the minority as I don’t get the feeling that it’s a ‘wall wrapping’ system. I keep going away and coming back and just can’t get jenga or tetris out of my head, or even those coloured wooden building blocks you used to have when you were a kid, remember them?

It’s something that looks really nice, and a lot of hard work has gone into, I just don’t get the sense of the wrapping system coming through in the branding.

Also, maybe on the webpage instead of having the words ‘new’ ‘design’ and ‘creative’ on the what I am calling the blocks, to have instead some of the positive community messages that the client is talking about in their key benefits. I’m not sure if this would work, just an initial thought, but it may help to demonstrate what they are selling.

Damn those building blocks, I just can’t get them out of my head.

When I first saw the logo above I wasn’t sure. I think on its own it would have been quite dull and lacking, but as I scrolled down, I liked it more and more. To see how it actually worked as part of a whole system is really useful in this case, I guess it’s that whole discussion about a brand being more than a logo and building a whole eco-system that visualises and communicates a concept. Wouldn’t say it’s my favourite identity design in the world, but great work nevertheless.

I’ll start by saying I love the colour scheme and imagery. I also love the concept, which reminds me of a very large scale version of what studios like Gecko Stickers and Harmonie Interieure are doing with their wall stickers.

Having said that, I agree with Adam that I don’t get a strong sense of what the product/service is through the branding. My first thought as to what it was turned out to be completely wrong (I initially thought it was either an urban development scheme aimed at giving local people wall space to express themselves through art, or an extension of the company’s anti-graffiti products).

The shapes of the blocks also made me think it was only suitable for outdoor, large buildings, but this doesn’t appear to be the case. Of course all this is just my opinion, but the whole thing needed a bit of explaining before I got it (although that could be because I’m a bit dim). To compare and contrast with another recent identity here on ID – Deskidea – the product/service was represented very well (in my opinion).

When I found out what Wallspace was all about and how versatile it is, something along the lines of the changing AOL designs sprang to kind – I know tons of people panned it, but I can’t help but have a soft spot for it.

Perhaps, as Adam suggests, better use of copywriting would have helped? Perhaps I really am just dim?

Great colour palette and an instantly recognisable design set. That pattern reminds me of one of those optical illusions – if you stare at it long enough it starts to mess with your brain!!

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