Identity Designed is a showcase of brand identity projects from around the world.

Yume Umē

Contributed by Jim Walls of 160over90.

Yume Umē dinner

Based out of Gainesville, Florida, Rolls n’ Bowls is a made-to-order Japanese kitchen. In need of a new identity — one that could accentuate its strengths and propel the company from local stronghold to national franchise — Rolls n’ Bowls called on 160over90.

Upon developing a concept that focuses on customers’ ability to create the most unique sushi rolls, salads, and rice bowls they desire, Yume Umē was born. In addition to this new name and identity, 160over90 created a logo, website, menu, and campaign pieces by the project’s end.

Japanese for “Delicious Dream,” Yume Umē now emphasizes the role of imagination and creativity in the experience at Yume Umē, where “Imagination is Edible.”

Yume Umē print advertising

Yume Umē print advertising

Yume Umē print advertising

Yume Umē logo

Yume Umē logo

“The name fits what we do and it has so much potential. It has a subliminal message as well as a strong meaning. Our name is creative, fun, unique, fresh, and intelligent.”
— HIRO LEUNG, YUME UME

Yume Umē bag

Yume Umē sauce label

Yume Umē sauce label

Yume Umē apparel

Yume Umē apparel

Yume Umē website

Yume Umē website

Yume Umē website

Yume Umē website

Yume Umē franchise brochure
Franchise brochure

Yume Umē franchise brochure

Yume Umē takeaway box

Yume Umē takeaway box

Yume Umē bowl

Yume Umē bowl

Yume Umē bowl

Client: Yume Umē (website currently hosted on 160over90)
Agency: 160over90
Creative director: Stephen Penning
Copywriter: Kyle Arango
Designer and illustrator: Kelly Dorsey

View more brand identity work on the 160over90 website. Follow 160over90 on Twitter.

10 appreciated remarks about “Yume Umē”

  1. We love this. It’s fun, it’s about more than just a logo, it feels un-corporate.

    Really lovely. One of the best jobs I’ve seen on ID.

  2. The price for trendiness is that you will need a new design five years from now as this one will no longer feel fresh and at that point.

  3. Wow, this entire identity is something else.

    I love Japanese food and I simply love this! Very cleverly done and I agree with Lee Newham, incredibly fun to look at and not corporate in the slightest.

    From the colourful monster illustrations and quirky comments, all the way down to the designs at the bottom of the bowls, they have really hit home with this one. Genius! :)

  4. If you are talking about trendiness Christian then I would have said this represents a trend that was at its peak a good 5 years ago (with the rise of the Innocent smoothies brand et al). While everything is good for this I find it hard to see, from what is shown and explained, how this strategy functions long term and why this particular identity is best.

    The dream concept works, yes. The illustrations are nice, yes. The puns on every item are fun, yes. But where does it all come together? The puns may get old and items need updated. What about the nitty gritty typography, colour and such of the brand? The work might all be there but not shown here but leaves me with questions. I’d like to know myself how roll out a more fun, flexible, playful strategy and avoid some pitfalls, such as it 1) getting old and 2) being consistent in the more serious brand side of things.

  5. I like the image, but the anal Japanese-speaker in me slightly balks at the name. Which is rather petty, I admit.

    But while I am being petty, why use ‘Fin!’ instead of a Japanese word like ‘Owari’ or ‘Gochisousama’? To continue on my petty streak with the copy, it’s playful and ignores grammar rules in certain places, then uses words like ‘procure’ in others where a simpler word would be more in keeping with the tone.

    In short – a nice image, but the copy needs work, and it needs editing. Things like “environment—” shouldn’t be appearing on a website.

  6. I’ve just noticed, the editor here converted what I wanted to express. My last sentence should read ‘Things like “environment (ampersand m dash ;)…”

    Oof, now I feel even pettier.

  7. I love this! It’s fresh, quirky, and gets you wanting more because of all the puns. The name is fun to say over and over. I do see the brand needing a refresh once the novelty of the current design is over, but it’d be hard for the designer to stay on board for a refresh of packaging and pun ideas every few years.

    Richard, I think they chose “Fin” instead of a Japanese word because…you know? As in a fish fin. Nice little pun that I had to go back for to catch :)

  8. I feel looking at this like I do a movie that might have some technical flaws but if I laughed and/or cried, I don’t really want to pick it apart. I felt it on an emotional level, which was my reaction here. It’s totally delightful.

    I agree with the folks that say it might not stand the test of time. But the cleverness and completeness shown here tells me the design firm could do another equally successful iteration, like keeping the humor and the color palette, for example.

    I particularly like the how the logo can go two ways with the small blob (wasabi?) in the upper left and also enveloping the typography. Not easy to do in a logo.

  9. I am worried about how often I hear designers say something is trendy and there for it is bad. This is good fun work that made me smile, which means it made a positive connection with me and thus a positive interaction with this company.

    I don’t even think this is trendy. It has its own character as well as being a solution that avoids all the trappings of being a safe corporate identity.

  10. A great example of how branding isn’t just about a logo. It requires thought process far beyond the initial identity.

    I also love that it’s playful right up to the last detail – even the take away box is so brilliant – it forces the customer to engage with the brand, because who couldn’t? It’s adorable!

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